III Points 2021 Day Two Review: Rüfüs Du Sol, Wu-Tang Clan, Zhu, Washed Out

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After two days, III Points 2021 is over. It was a weekend filled with stellar moments – and perhaps more importantly, clues as to what’s to come.

If you’ve been following the festival since its inception in 2013, you can’t help but marvel at how far it has come. This first edition was chaotically assembled in just a few months; looking at the crowd that gathered for Rüfüs Du Sol last night, New times couldn’t help but wonder, Are we witnessing the emergence of points III?

Even with delays that have seen the festival date pushed back several times, 2021 will be a transitional year for the festival, one that could see it return next year as Miami’s premier music event. While the crowd was mostly Southern Floridians, there seemed to be a lot of people who traveled here for the event.

III Points is quickly approaching a crossroads where he will have to decide what kind of festival he wants to be. From our perspective, the best course would be to continue to be a genre-defying event designed for touring and local artists to share the stage. That’s what made the festival special – why play with a winning formula?

The future aside, Saturday brought many highlights as the rain stayed at bay until the early hours of the morning. Here are some representations New times captured on the second day of III Points 2021.

Click to enlarge Slowthai - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

Slowthai

Photo by Karli Evans

Slowthai

British rapper Slowthai took to the Main Frame stage at 9pm, asking the crowd, “Are you ready to get fucked? and immediately launched into “Enemy”. The 26-year-old’s style is aggressive and influenced by British grime and punk. This was evident from the start, even though the sound mix of the first few songs seemed a bit offbeat. During “Canceled,” Slowthai proudly proclaimed, “How are you going to cancel me? / Twenty Chimney Rewards / Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury. “ But it was during his performances of Denzel Curry’s “Psycho” and “Mazza” Cup that the Miami crowd lost its shit. Imported rap always feels like it’s being treated like a novelty in America, but rappers like Slowthai demonstrate that the genre’s influence has transcended America’s borders. José D. Duran

Click to enlarge Thundercat - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

Thunder cat

Photo by Karli Evans

Thunder cat

Watching Thundercat play brings comfort to the soul of the listener – it’s like putting on an old sweater. For over an hour, Stephen Lee Bruner (AKA Thundercat) plucked his six-string bass and sang his falsetto, demolishing the cliché that the bassist can’t be the star of the show. Bruner played his contemporary songs enriched with funk and gave way to self-service jazz improvisations – a welcome break from rhythm-matching or cataloging. Thundercat’s acid jazz and 70s funk-inspired solos, combined with his lively demeanor, gave birth to jazzy sounds that seemed to have been filtered out by late-night adult swim marathons. The music somehow managed to be slow and respectful while being both frenetic and Atari sounding at the same time. Towards the end, jazz, funk and soul turned into 80s synth-pop melodies with Bruner’s “Funny Thing”. Thundercat closed with “Them Changes,” thanked his bandmates and the crowd, and left the stage like an old friend leaving town. Grant Albert

Click to enlarge Faded - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

Washed out

Photo by Karli Evans

Washed out

If Khruangbin was the tailor-made outfit for Friday’s music festival, Saturday’s best example was Washed Out, which drew what may have been the largest crowd to gather on the stage in Sector 3. Led by Ernest Greene, the band quickly set a dreamy, serene tone as projections of crashing waves played in the background. The set included performances from cups like “Reckless Desires” and “Feel It All Around,” but the reveal of the night was “Get Lost,” in which the graphics declared, “Take a hit and get lost”. The crowd seemed to agree as they let Greene take them, likely to a place where the pandemic never happened. The set of Washed Out seemed designed to warm up the crowd with the band’s signature lo-fi numbers and a slow build before delving into more danceable electronic numbers. José D. Duran

Click to enlarge The Wu-Tang clan - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

The Wu-Tang clan

Photo by Karli Evans

Wu-Tang Clan

The mere presence of the Wu-Tang Clan is enough to ensure a historic boost as the group bounces back through their classics. Wu-Tang got it off to a good start with album one, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 rooms), track one, “Bring da Ruckus.” Ghostface Killa first spat and taught the audience how a proper flow is accomplished. The crowd, draped in Wu-Tang memorabilia, regardless of the age of the participants, rapped all the lyrics. Hands were going side to side, heads were jumping up and down. “CREAM” brought the madness as Wu-Tang deftly rapped the first verse of “Can It Be All So Simple”, then brought back the verse two later when everyone was least expecting the rhythm to return more slow. Out of respect for fallen member Ol ‘Dirty Bastard, the LEDs displayed a photo of ODB as the just passed full moon glowed from above. ODB’s son Young Dirty Bastard swept the ground with the group’s gritty stream to Staten Island. Wu-Tang remains a permanent fixture, and it’s pretty obvious why: Wu-Tang Clan isn’t nothing to … well, you know the rest. Grant Albert

Zhu

With every hallway filled with bass-hungry festival-goers wanting to see DJ / producer Zhu bless the decks, you had to bite your teeth, engage your core, and not move a literal muscle if you wanted to catch a glimpse. The collective sweat of the crowd thickened to the consistency of maple syrup, but all signs of discomfort evaporated when the San Fransico DJ spun the grinding bass mixed with coated vocals. sugar. Zhu’s ability to add textures that flirt between dreamy EDM-style openings and deeper rhythm creates an open space, at least sonorous, even in the most sultry environments. At one point the DJ brought in beefy synth hits and a thunderous drum pattern that somehow shifted effortlessly to a fixing melody – like it was just another night for Zhu. . The crowd for his Main Frame set made a box of anchovies seem spacious in comparison, but Zhu’s ethereal elements gave the illusion of openness – a theme that has never left the set. Grant Albert

Click to enlarge Rüfüs Du Sol - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

Rufus Du Sol

Photo by Karli Evans

Rufus Du Sol

The Australian trio Rüfüs Du Sol undoubtedly won the award for best participation in their performance on the Mind Melt stage. Crowds almost filled the entire precinct with Mana, adding to the feeling that the real headliner of the festival had arrived. Barely released from his last album, Abandonment, Rüfüs Du Sol delivered a set that balanced the band’s new material with many fan favorites dotted around. The trio entered the stage and waved to the crowd before climbing up to three platforms containing all of their gear. An elongated intro kicked off, followed by crowd pleaser “Eyes”. The stage was lit by a cornucopia of panels and LED lights, offering a glimpse of the audiovisual mayhem to come. Great performances from “You Were Right” and “Devotion” followed, but “On My Knees” stood out as a highlight. The scene turned ominously red when singer Tyrone Lindqvist descended from his perch. “Looks like I’m on my knees again / I feel like the walls are closing” he sang in a way reminiscent of Trent Reznor at his most poppy. Rüfüs Du Sol’s performance was easily the star of the weekend – shockingly eclipsing other headliners like the Strokes and Wu-Tang. José D. Duran

Click to enlarge Kaytranada - PHOTO BY KARLI EVANS

Kaytranada

Photo by Karli Evans

Kaytranada

III Points’ dance-music offerings tend to land in the house and techno categories, so it was refreshing to walk to the Main Frame stage and hear Haitian-Canadian producer Kaytranada blend in with R&B and funk and give everyone a break from the constant bass. . As with Gou on opening night, it was impossible to catch Kaytranada if you didn’t arrive early. Bodies spilled out into the area leading up to the RC Cola stage, but that didn’t seem to dampen the excitement, so adept at Kaytranada is building energy, only to release it unexpectedly. Even those who were tired of being up all day couldn’t help but dance – even if it was just to keep the inevitable physical pain caused by the festival at bay. José D. Duran


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